Category Archives: What is it?

Satire – The Definitive Guide to Satire: Etymology, History & Lore

Satire is an indirect form of critique, in that it mocks or attacks an individual or idea by proxy. Satirical speech and literature is generally used to observe and judge the “evils” or morally questionable ideals held by individuals, groups and sometimes entire cultures. The attack itself is derived from what is known as the satirist’s social motive–these critiques illustrate what the satirist, within the context of their own world view, believes is “right” based upon what they ridicule as “wrong”. Jean Weisgerber’s Satire and Irony a Means of Communication states, “Satire is manifestly directed to people. It involves the victim it attacks and the public it tries to persuade, it restores to language its full status as a means of communication, its end is rhetorical.”

The purpose of satire is primarily to make the audience aware of the “truth”. The satirist makes an argument that relies upon the intellect of the listener to decipher hidden meaning, with the ideal end goal to inform, enlighten, explain and correct the audience. Due to its critical and judging nature, satire is sometimes deemed excessive or in poor taste.

Despite the aggressive, sometimes-personal attacks that are derived from works of satire, it serves a special purpose–catharsis. Satire, particularly in the form of comedy, allows both narrators and audiences to turn outrage, hatred and “other socially unacceptable impulse[s] into socially acceptable and even delightful forms.” [3] Neither the victim of the satirist’s attack, nor the satirist are subject to physical violence.

In a press release following the incident, the New Yorker explained that the cover, “satirizes the use of scare tactics and misinformation in the Presidential election to derail Barack Obama’s campaign.” Blitt went on to defend his cover as well, saying, “I think the idea that the Obamas are branded as unpatriotic [let alone as terrorists] in certain sectors is preposterous. It seemed to me that depicting the concept would show it as the fear-mongering ridiculousness that it is.”

 

Lincoln filmmakers celebrate award for social media satire

A team of talented filmmakers from the University of Lincoln are in contention for a national Royal Television Society (RTS) Award after winning a regional title for their satirical review of society’s obsession with social media.

Facebook Anonymous is a ‘mockumentary’ that reveals the real dangers of Facebook addiction, and it was named as the winner in the Comedy and Entertainment category at the RTS Midlands Student Awards.

Produced by Thomas Mckie, Ashley Wilks, Luke Winter and Alexander Whitcombe while students in Lincoln’s School of Film & Media, the film was celebrated by RTS judges as “an outstanding entry”.

The prize was presented by BAFTA award-winning actress Vicky McClure, who starred in This is England, as well as television series Line of Duty and Broadchurch. As winners at the regional awards, the Lincoln team will go on to compete at the national RTS Awards in spring 2015.

The filmmakers, who graduated from the University earlier this year, now work together as Wall Breaker– an independent corporate video production company which has already been commissioned by national clients.

Ashley Wilks said: “We’re absolutely thrilled about winning the award. We worked very hard on the film, spending over six months developing, shooting and editing it. We used professional actors and shot in numerous locations throughout the UK.”

The team also secured a nomination for their film, The Last Fisherman, in the Drama section, and a student from the University’s School of English & Journalism, Anna Paterson, was nominated in the Factual category for her documentary, Invincible.

Yes, there are undercover cops in instagram

Facebook is not the only social network where undercover cops are hanging out and trying to make friends. Undercover officers might also be among those asking to follow you on Instagram if they suspect your private account harbors artfully photo-filtered evidence of misdeeds.

Facebook is not the only social network where undercover cops are hanging out and trying to make friends. Undercover officers might also be among those asking to follow you on Instagram if they suspect your private account harbors artfully photo-filtered evidence of misdeeds.

 

Daniel Gatson spent a decade in prison for a string of burglaries in New Jersey in the ’90s; among those whose houses he looted was Patrick Ewing, making off with the former NBA player’s jewelry, fur coats, electronics, Lincoln Navigator and Mercedes Benz. When Gatson got out of prison in 2012, he allegedly got right back into the burglary game. Law enforcement spent nearly a year investigating him, collecting his email, monitoring his phone, and even bugging a minivan he rented. Law enforcement got court orders for most of this information collection, but not for peeping at his Instagram account. According to court filings, Gatson had wisely made his Instagram account private so casual visitors wouldn’t see him posting photos of himself with considerable bling. But he unwisely said “yes” when an undercover law enforcement officer posing as a normal Instagram user asked to follow his account.

According to court filings, “as part of its nearly year-long investigation into Gatson and other co conspirators, law enforcement officers used an undercover account to become Instagram ‘friends’ with Gatson.” (The filings don’t say whether Gatson followed the undercover account back, or whether the undercover account ‘hearted’ any of Gatson’s photos.) According to an FBI agent on the case, Gatson “used the Instagram account to display photographs of himself with large amounts of cash and jewelry, which were quite possibly the proceeds” from his burglaries. Gatson tried to challenge prosecutors using the incriminating selfies against him in court, saying the undercover Instagram bestie violated his 4th Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure by friending him without probable cause. The judge in the case was unswayed, denying his request to suppress the evidence collected by the undercover Instagram account, ruling that police don’t need a warrant for “the consensual sharing of this type of information.”

Undercover officers have been haunting social networks for years, but they’ve started to get more creative in how they go about getting people to accept friend requests. Earlier this year, Buzzfeed reported that a DEA agent used photos downloaded from an arrested woman’s phone to create a fake Facebook account in her name in order to communicate with a wanted fugitive. Facebook complained to the DEA that the practice violated its terms of service and asked the drug-combating agency not to impersonate people on its site in the future. The Justice Department said it would review the practice.

Image from: gettyimages

Web 2.0 Satire Is Snowballing

In this age of conversation, it seems you almost HAVE to ‘lead, follow, or get out of the way’ when a message devolves into this level of “he said, she said” anecdotal sparring.

Believe me, that’s my chapter in the upcoming second edition of the Age of Conversation, ‘Why People Don’t Get It” to benefit Variety, The Children’s Charity.

I chose the ‘marketing triumphs and tragedies’ category to reveal lessons learned from the Target fandango when the conversation veered away from its original purpose…

Apologies in advance for any offense. To me, this type of comedy sketch-satire is purposeful in breaking through the ad clutter, to call attention to the absurdity of what’s being justified in the name of profit. Web 2.0 helps level the playing field for those with a voice and a message trying to be heard through the dollar-driven ‘Appetite for Profit’ which supersedes public health and well being.
Apologies in advance for any offense. To me, this type of comedy sketch-satire is purposeful in breaking through the ad clutter, to call attention to the absurdity of what’s being justified in the name of profit. Web 2.0 helps level the playing field for those with a voice and a message trying to be heard through the dollar-driven ‘Appetite for Profit’ which supersedes public health and well being.

Corporations? Take heed.

The HFCS ads will no doubt be a textbook marketing no-no.

I understand their “marketing strategy” to ‘seed doubt’ about factual data…but it’s dicey in execution…just as it’s a challenge for junk food giants to come off looking genuine when they’re handing out pedometers with their happy meals. Ugh.

“Moderation messages” are tough when the item in question is viewed as a vice. I remember working on Mumm Cuvee Napa when the mandate hit that the ‘drink responsibly’ message needed to trump the celebratory one…

That said, it IS possible to celebrate responsibly and in moderation…you put the glass down. Can’t quite do that with HFCS embedded in the food supply far beyond ‘junk food only,’ it takes LOTS of label literacy and due diligence to sift it out of your pantry altogether. Truth is…

The general public may SEEM like Sheeple sometimes, but the youth audience particularlyhas a low tolerance for saccharine, artificial approaches and sugar-coated spin…

Like that ant and the rubber tree plant, those of us with high hopes for a better world can swarm, work together, and lift many times our body size…

Be advised spinmeisters, ants work diligently when mobilized for a purpose…

And they bite. Hard.

Visual Credit of Ant and Rubber Tree Plant graphic: Smart-Central.com Nursery Rhymes

Now…Here’s that edgy video by “Aernk” on YouTube as promised…

Apologies in advance for any offense. To me, this type of comedy sketch-satire is purposeful in breaking through the ad clutter, to call attention to the absurdity of what’s being justified in the name of profit. Web 2.0 helps level the playing field for those with a voice and a message trying to be heard through the dollar-driven ‘Appetite for Profit’ which supersedes public health and well being.

image from: buzzwordhell.com