Being famous in a social media-obsessed world: Kirsten Dunst stars in short satire film exposing the weirdness of selfie culture

Kirsten Dunst has starred in a two-minute short film about what it’s like to be a celebrity in our social-media obsessed culture.

Other actresses Mr Frost has enlisted in his short films include Cate Blanchett in a 'slow motion' satire, Kate Winslet in an interview spoof, and Jessica Chastain turning on a fan who is attempting to take a sly photo.   Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2768450/Being-famous-social-media-obsessed-world-Kirsten-Dunst-stars-short-satire-film-exposing-weirdness-selfie-culture.html#ixzz3Mbexc5pR  Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Other actresses Mr Frost has enlisted in his short films include Cate Blanchett in a ‘slow motion’ satire, Kate Winslet in an interview spoof, and Jessica Chastain turning on a fan who is attempting to take a sly photo.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2768450/Being-famous-social-media-obsessed-world-Kirsten-Dunst-stars-short-satire-film-exposing-weirdness-selfie-culture.html#ixzz3Mbexc5pR
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The dramatization, which was shot for Vs. Magazine by filmmaker Matthew Frost, shows the 32-year-old actress getting accosted by a pair of female fans outside what appears to be her Los Angeles home.

Upon snapping a number of selfies with the star, the fans all but ignore Miss Dunst in favor of their phones – even when she attempts polite conversation. Then, they arrogantly implore her to ‘tag’ them from her own social media account.

 Miss Dunst agreed to take part in the film after she declared herself a fan of Mr Frost’s best-known skit, Fashion Film, starring Izzy Caplan, which mocks forced ‘artsiness.’

In his latest offering, titled Aspirational, Miss Dunst is filmed waiting for an Uber car when the two fans screech to a halt in their car alongside her and ask: ‘Are you Kirsten Dunst?’

The actress wryly confirms that yes she is, after which the girls scramble out of their car and wordlessly, without asking permission, start taking numerous selfies with her.

Miss Dunst, who asks the girls ‘How are you?’ and is entirely ignored, is gracious, if a little baffled with their impromptu photo shoot.

‘Don’t you want your friend to take it?’ she asks one of the girls, who is struggling to get her own face into frame with the actress.

‘I don’t trust her,’ the girl responds shortly.

Both distinctly unenthusiastic ‘fans’ then start typing into their phones fiendishly as they share their prized selfies.

Image from: dailymail.co.uk

Yes, there are undercover cops in instagram

Facebook is not the only social network where undercover cops are hanging out and trying to make friends. Undercover officers might also be among those asking to follow you on Instagram if they suspect your private account harbors artfully photo-filtered evidence of misdeeds.

Facebook is not the only social network where undercover cops are hanging out and trying to make friends. Undercover officers might also be among those asking to follow you on Instagram if they suspect your private account harbors artfully photo-filtered evidence of misdeeds.

 

Daniel Gatson spent a decade in prison for a string of burglaries in New Jersey in the ’90s; among those whose houses he looted was Patrick Ewing, making off with the former NBA player’s jewelry, fur coats, electronics, Lincoln Navigator and Mercedes Benz. When Gatson got out of prison in 2012, he allegedly got right back into the burglary game. Law enforcement spent nearly a year investigating him, collecting his email, monitoring his phone, and even bugging a minivan he rented. Law enforcement got court orders for most of this information collection, but not for peeping at his Instagram account. According to court filings, Gatson had wisely made his Instagram account private so casual visitors wouldn’t see him posting photos of himself with considerable bling. But he unwisely said “yes” when an undercover law enforcement officer posing as a normal Instagram user asked to follow his account.

According to court filings, “as part of its nearly year-long investigation into Gatson and other co conspirators, law enforcement officers used an undercover account to become Instagram ‘friends’ with Gatson.” (The filings don’t say whether Gatson followed the undercover account back, or whether the undercover account ‘hearted’ any of Gatson’s photos.) According to an FBI agent on the case, Gatson “used the Instagram account to display photographs of himself with large amounts of cash and jewelry, which were quite possibly the proceeds” from his burglaries. Gatson tried to challenge prosecutors using the incriminating selfies against him in court, saying the undercover Instagram bestie violated his 4th Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure by friending him without probable cause. The judge in the case was unswayed, denying his request to suppress the evidence collected by the undercover Instagram account, ruling that police don’t need a warrant for “the consensual sharing of this type of information.”

Undercover officers have been haunting social networks for years, but they’ve started to get more creative in how they go about getting people to accept friend requests. Earlier this year, Buzzfeed reported that a DEA agent used photos downloaded from an arrested woman’s phone to create a fake Facebook account in her name in order to communicate with a wanted fugitive. Facebook complained to the DEA that the practice violated its terms of service and asked the drug-combating agency not to impersonate people on its site in the future. The Justice Department said it would review the practice.

Image from: gettyimages

Five Hilarious Satirical News Sites

With so much going on in the world, we tend to take the news very seriously. People who publish satirical news sites know this, and love to play with your head. Judging by how easily people buy into conspiracy theories, it’s no surprise that some folks, even traditional news reporters, fall for the satire hoax. Don’t be that person. Before you respond with righteous indignation to an outrageous news story, check this list of satirical news sites.

With so much going on in the world, we tend to take the news very seriously. People who publish satirical news sites know this, and love to play with your head.
With so much going on in the world, we tend to take the news very seriously. People who publish satirical news sites know this, and love to play with your head.

1. The Borowitz Report

The New Yorker hosts the satirical humor of Andy Borowitz, who delivers his “news stories” with a “straight face.” His career as a political satirist began during the 1990′s, when he started emailing fake news pieces to his friends. His work is so convincing that China’s Xinhua news agency reported that Amazon founder Jeff Bezos explained his acquisition of the Washington Post” as an unintentional mouse click.”  They thought that it hat to be true, since they found the story on The New Yorker.

2. The National Report

During the government shut-down, Anna Kooiman of Fox and friends reported that President Obama was using his own funds to keep a Muslim Museum open. The article on The National Report stated that Kooiman apologized on her Twitter site when she realized that she had posted information from asatirical article on the National Report.

3. Super Tuesday News

4. The Daily Currant

Washington Post reporter Suzi Parker thought she had reached the high point of her career, when she reported that

5. El Deforma

Following Apple’s win in the mutual patent infringement case against Samsung,  the jury assessed one billion dollars in damages. Yahoo News was quick to report that Samsung paid Apple its $1bn fine by sending more than 30 trucks to Apple’s headquarters loaded with nickels. Unfortunately, Yahoo got the story from El Deforma, a Mexican news parody site. The Yahoo reporter failed to notice the tip of the day on the El Deforma site, which reads “Si vas a plagiar noticias, no uses un sitio de noticias falsas como fuente.” Or In English: “If you’re going to steal news, make sure not to use a fake news site as a source.”

image from: toptensocialmedia.com

Bride Kidnapping: Why Wait?

Single men, are you stressed by dating? Is your wallet lean from expensive dates? Are you weary of sharing personal information and intimate feelings to woo your woman?Would you like to free all men from the stresses of dating, and renew male dominance in society?Consider the Central Asian practice of bride kidnapping!

It’s simple. First convince your relatives that bride kidnapping is the most honorable, economical way to secure a bride. Then seek the girl of your dreams. Maybe you already know her and she has rejected your friendship or even your marriage proposal. If you haven’t met her yet, find a beauty on the street or at a mall, or meet her at a party. No need to talk with her or court her—just discover where she lives, and wait until dark. While she’s dreaming of meeting the perfect man, sneak into her house and kidnap her. Have an escape car ready, and drive directly to your parents’ home.

With your relatives’ help to contain her kicking and screaming, force her into a back room and consummate the marriage. Keep her captive until she accepts that you are her ideal man. She’ll soon overlook your minor flaws of binge drinking, wife-beating, and frequent flings with other women.

With your relatives’ help to contain her kicking and screaming, force her into a back room and consummate the marriage. Keep her captive until she accepts that you are her ideal man. She’ll soon overlook your minor flaws of binge drinking, wife-beating, and frequent flings with other women. She’ll joyfully serve as slave to your mother and your older brothers’ wives, because soon she’ll no longer be the lowest slave—when your younger brother kidnaps his bride.

It really is quite simple. All you have to do is pay off the police and they’ll help you protect your prize—the woman who is rightfully yours. After all, bride kidnapping is a gallant tradition of which even Julius Caesar would approve: I came. I saw. I conquered.

Think of the positive effects on society. Men will regain their rightful place as rulers of their homes, and therefore of society and the world. Women will develop a healthy fear of men and become submissive and servile. What freedom! No more emotional sharing, no more expensive dates, no more upsetting equality. Men will rule with a righteous harsh hand. Their wives will always provide them food, sex and comfort, and the world will be a better place.

Bride kidnapping offers hope for a return to true manhood and a perfectly male-dominated society. Why wait?

With your relatives’ help to contain her kicking and screaming, force her into a back room and consummate the marriage. Keep her captive until she accepts that you are her ideal man. She’ll soon overlook your minor flaws of binge drinking, wife-beating, and frequent flings with other women.

This is the modern version of having comfort women. In East Asia, Japanese, as well as Korean Soldiers “order” Vietnam Comfort Women to satisfy their sexual pleasures. It is indeed a violation of human rights just like the kidnapping of brides. And this should be put into an end.

Images from:
a. http://www.newsweek.com/grab-and-run-1634
b. www.thegranitetower.com

Laugh if you like. But we need satire more than ever

The world of social media is a swirling, sometimes dizzying mess of contradictions. A powerful force for mobilising political change, or sometimes a glorified mass of torches and pitchforks; a means to instantly engage and debate with people of all leanings and all continents, or a means to obsessively harass, troll and threaten strangers; a tool to broaden horizons, or to be bombarded with nonsensical junk. But our social media, increasingly, are assuming a role that is crucial in a democracy: satirising and ridiculing the powerful.

Satire is so subversive – and often politically fatal for those who rule – because it exposes the absurdities of power. Authority attempts to assert itself partly through a veneer of respectability and seriousness. When that is stripped away, its legitimacy can be lost, along with our subservience. But as Jeremy Paxman asked a few months ago, “Where is the Spitting Image of today? ... Imagine the sport the show could have with Cameron and Clegg. But I don’t care whether it’s puppets or cartoons or real people. Just give us some decent satire.

Take the now flourishing Twitter-land of Trumpton. In a dig at Ukip’s desire to take Britain back to something approximating the iconic 1960s children’s programme, a Trumpton Ukip account was founded. It proved not to be to the taste of the party’s Scottish MEP, David Coburn, who attempted to have the account shut down and even apparently threatened legal action. Big mistake: the powerful attempting to menace those who poke fun at them is the ultimate provocation, and is particularly self-defeating. All Coburn has achieved is to make a relatively small-fry account the Twitter trend of the moment.

Political satire is booming online, where taking the mighty and the powerful down a peg or two is a sport. On the web you can find Vine videos of George Osborne looking spaced out at prime minister’s questions; and the mocking of broken political promises, from “We’re all in it together” to the trebling of tuition fees. Some of it is crude, unpolished or just not very funny. But thank goodness social media have taken up the mantle – because there is all too little of it on our TV screens.

Satire is so subversive – and often politically fatal for those who rule – because it exposes the absurdities of power. Authority attempts to assert itself partly through a veneer of respectability and seriousness. When that is stripped away, its legitimacy can be lost, along with our subservience. But as Jeremy Paxman asked a few months ago, “Where is the Spitting Image of today? … Imagine the sport the show could have with Cameron and Clegg. But I don’t care whether it’s puppets or cartoons or real people. Just give us some decent satire.

Image from: salon.com